Two Big Things

Two of our projects have recently had some great successes!

Our Global Game Jam game Cuppa Quest is a Finalist in this year’s IndieCade festival, and this past weekend we ran the first paid sessions of Spark of Resistance, our real-life escape the room game.

You can find more info about Cuppa Quest here (and the post I wrote about our GGJ2014 weekend here), and visit the Spark of Resistance site here. (If you’d like more info on escape the room games, I wrote a post of tips for new players and teams.)

I’m looking forward to posting a lengthy writeup of the Spark of Resistance/escape room game design, iteration and construction processes, but for now, I mostly need sleep.

Exploring Digital Ruins in The Atlantic

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I recently published an article in The Atlantic about digital cities:

“People build these communities without really recognizing what they are, then they suddenly realize, we’re out of money, we’ve changed priorities, we’ve been acquired—they decide to jettison their material,” Scott said. “That’s when we step in. We grab a copy of it for posterity, just because the conversation stops when the data is gone. We take a backup so that somebody can make use of it down the line.”

One of the archives promises that, just because a page isn’t displayed, it doesn’t mean it’s gone forever: “It may simply mean that we haven’t gotten around to restoring it.”

“Your page isn’t gone,” Scott said, when I mentioned my search. “It’s just in a quantum state.”

I also did a follow-up list of articles that explore the same topic, via my newsletter.

Making Our Escape

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I’ve been on a bit of a media diet lately, because an offline project has been consuming all of my energy for the last 6 months. We’re not quite ready to announce it formally, but we’ve been working on a real life escape the room game for Portland, Oregon, and it should be completed by the end of June. Stay tuned!

September 2014 update: The room is now live! Check out our page and book your tickets now.

Subscribe to my TinyLetter, start your own

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CC photo by Mi Mitrika

My friend Dan Hon has gotten me hooked on TinyLetter, which another friend of ours called “artisanal penpals”. Dan is using it as a near-daily writing exercise; I’m using it as a something between a blog post and a sort of longer, more themed Twitter. I’m doing it weekly, and I’m enjoying the pace.

Sign up for my newsletter here (and while you’re at it, sign up for Dan’s, too).

Have a favorite TinyLetter? Do you produce one of your own?* Let me know, in the comments.

*Maybe you should. Go on.

UPDATE 4/7/14: Dan and I were trying to figure out the best way to connect all these funny little letter things together, so we made a webring, 1997-style: The Internet of Newsletters. Join us, won’t you?