60 Minutes to Escape at Adventure Design Group

adventuredesigngroup

Last month, I traveled with three of my fellow escape the room game makers to San Francisco, where mink and I delivered a talk to the Adventure Design Group.

We led the ADG in a Mastermind-style game about dystopian bureaucracy before giving a conversational presentation about the logistics and production realities of creating a successful, self-sustaining real-life escape the room game.

Thanks to Gabe Smedresden for inviting us to present! We had a great time, and were honored to speak to such a talented and interesting group of people.

Escape the Room News Roundup

“Spark of Resistance” got a very nice writeup in The Oregonian. The article also includes some photographs which, if you are the type of person who wants to go into a room uninitiated, may contain light spoilers.

Mink and I were on Curtis and Dee-Ann’s podcast to talk about 60 Minutes to Escape, as part of their “women in puzzles” series (53:50).

And finally, we’ll be going down to San Francisco in early December to do a talk for the Adventure Design Group.

Two Big Things

Two of our projects have recently had some great successes!

Our Global Game Jam game Cuppa Quest is a Finalist in this year’s IndieCade festival, and this past weekend we ran the first paid sessions of Spark of Resistance, our real-life escape the room game.

You can find more info about Cuppa Quest here (and the post I wrote about our GGJ2014 weekend here), and visit the Spark of Resistance site here. (If you’d like more info on escape the room games, I wrote a post of tips for new players and teams.)

I’m looking forward to posting a lengthy writeup of the Spark of Resistance/escape room game design, iteration and construction processes, but for now, I mostly need sleep.

Exploring Digital Ruins in The Atlantic

atlanticarticlelauraehall

I recently published an article in The Atlantic about digital cities:

“People build these communities without really recognizing what they are, then they suddenly realize, we’re out of money, we’ve changed priorities, we’ve been acquired—they decide to jettison their material,” Scott said. “That’s when we step in. We grab a copy of it for posterity, just because the conversation stops when the data is gone. We take a backup so that somebody can make use of it down the line.”

One of the archives promises that, just because a page isn’t displayed, it doesn’t mean it’s gone forever: “It may simply mean that we haven’t gotten around to restoring it.”

“Your page isn’t gone,” Scott said, when I mentioned my search. “It’s just in a quantum state.”

I also did a follow-up list of articles that explore the same topic, via my newsletter.