Category Archives: storytelling

Lady Delaney’s Letters from Dead People

Last year, I signed up for an intriguing murder-mystery-by-mail from the New Orleans-based Lady Delaney, writer and miniaturist. So when she recently announced a new by-mail subscription service, “Letters From Dead People”, I bought a subscription immediately. Continue reading

Ephemera-Based Storytelling at Now Play This Games Exhibition in London

(Photographer: Ben Peter Catchpole)

In April, I had the privilege of creating a newly-commissioned art/play piece, “The Silence in Room 1258” for Now Play This, a games festival in London. Situated in an antique desk, the game is a self-paced examination of ephemera from a 1930s Hollywood hotel after a paranormal incident. Continue reading

Podcast Roundup

I’ve been on a few podcasts recently, so I wanted to gather them into one place:

Listen To This – I was interviewed by Asher Isbrucker about my “Find Satoshi” project, an attempt to locate a man given only his photograph and first name, part of the Perplex City Alternate Reality Game (ARG) and an experiment in six degrees of separation

Talking To Ghosts – I chat with Wesley Mueller and Michael Kurt about journaling, abandoned spaces in Second Life, the beauty and danger of VR, plot without conflict, and games in physical spaces

Script Lock – a conversation with Max and Nick Folkman and Ian Thomas about moment-driven story design, escape rooms and narrative live action experiences, Punchdrunk’s immersive theatre, environmental storytelling, breaking games, how to write for experiences where you can’t control what the player will do, puzzle design, VR shorthand, and more

Exploring Digital Ruins in The Atlantic

atlanticarticlelauraehall

I recently published an article in The Atlantic about digital cities:

“People build these communities without really recognizing what they are, then they suddenly realize, we’re out of money, we’ve changed priorities, we’ve been acquired—they decide to jettison their material,” Scott said. “That’s when we step in. We grab a copy of it for posterity, just because the conversation stops when the data is gone. We take a backup so that somebody can make use of it down the line.”

One of the archives promises that, just because a page isn’t displayed, it doesn’t mean it’s gone forever: “It may simply mean that we haven’t gotten around to restoring it.”

“Your page isn’t gone,” Scott said, when I mentioned my search. “It’s just in a quantum state.”

I also did a follow-up list of articles that explore the same topic, via my newsletter.